Paddock Paradise Track Systems

Sharing your home with an animal can be a dream or a nightmare. Making sure your equid has their needs met will give both of you more time to enjoy each other’s company. Paddock Paradise Track System is a modern twist to a traditional square paddock designed for increased movement of horses and protection of pastures.

Its invention is attributed to Jaime Jackson in the 1980s while he was studying wild horses in their natural environment. If you are interested in more information, I encourage you to look into Jaime Jackson's book titled "Paddock Paradise: A Guide to Natural Horse Boarding".

The basic principle of the Paddock Paradise Track System, or PPTS as you will see me reference it, is to mimic a natural environment of a wild horse in our traditional domesticated setting. This involves modifying the pasture to creating a track around it with additional fencing and subsequently dividing the interior pastures to accommodate rotational grazing.

What is so great about it is that it can fit any size property. 1 acre to 1000 acres and everywhere in between, you and your horses can benefit from a PPTS. I can successfully keep 2 adult horses on 1 acre. No, that is not a typo. A PPTS, rotational grazing along with a Pasture Management Plan based off my soil analysis keeps my pastures healthy and protected and my horses grazing all growing season.

Benefits:

For your horses

-       Increased movement of your equids

-       Decrease in parasite loads

-       Healthier hooves

-       Improved endocrine, metabolic and immune system

-       Optimum body condition

For your pasture

-       Protection during wet weather/winter

-       Prevents overgrazing

-       Reduces noxious weeds

-       Normalizes sugar content of grasses

For you

-       Simplify your husbandry

-       Keeps your horses fit so you can ride

-       Less mowing

-       Less hay

-       Less herbicides

-       Less fertilizer

-       More time to ride

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